Attic Master Suite with Eucalyptus Green Bathroom

Designer: Cat Schmidt
Location: Mount Baker, Seattle, WA
Scope: Attic Dormer Addition, Master Suite, Bathroom, Stairway and Landing
Sustainability: Low-VOC paint, 80-90% recycle rate, LED lighting, ENERGY STAR certified ventilation fan, low-flow fixtures and toilet, mini split ductless heating and cooling system

One of the most popular Seattle remodels for our company is the attic master suite. When home prices are soaring, homeowners are looking for tangible ways to add more space to their existing home so they don’t have to move. Besides a basement remodel, the best way to add functionality to your home is by adding to and/or finishing an attic space. A dormer addition can add a generous amount of ceiling height, allowing for a bathroom addition in accordance with Seattle building codes (currently a minimum 6’8” height at the center line of bathroom fixtures, and at least 7′ height for 50% of the area in rooms with sloped ceilings). This attic remodel added plenty of headroom by building out a large, extended dormer. The extra space was used to for a linen closet and master bathroom addition, as well as a taller ceiling in the master bedroom. The fresh eucalyptus green and deep greys give the upper floor a modern, but soothing look.

The master bath was the main focus of the remodel; the attic conversion created a private master suite upstairs. The homeowner’s wanted the bathroom to be a retreat, with a large Mirabelle Galatia soaking tub that could also be used as a shower. Other requests included: natural light, a vanity with storage and eye-catching tile. We delivered, and our designer didn’t stop there. The fine details are what make this bathroom addition a Pinterest-worthy space. Shiplap bathtub siding, crystal drawer pulls, Schoolhouse sconces, and a frosted glass door add subtle touches of elegance.

 

Other work included: new windows, flooring, stairway, railing, insulation, siding and roofing. The Somerset solid oak hardwood flooring is a vast improvement from the preexisting vinyl tile and carpet squares that once blanketed the attic floor. The extension of the hardwood into the bedroom elongates the entire space. The stairwell received a face lift as well with white painted railings and a fun, bubble pendant light.

From the exterior, the dormer addition matches the home in both style and color just as the original dormer did. Scalloped siding brings softness to the brick below, without drawing too much attention. It is a smart choice we agreed with mimicking.

Attic dormers add useful space and natural light to make an attic feel like a natural extension of the home. Common types of dormer additions include:

  • Gable dormers: resemble canine condos, include a roof that peaks in the middle and is pitched on both sides
  • Shed dormers: rectangular and sloped in the same direction as the main roofline
  • Flat roof dormers: a flat extension from the peak of the main roof
  • Hipped dormers: like a gabled dormer but with three sloped roof planes, typical of the American Foursquare home style
  • Eyebrow dormers: more for aesthetic and natural lighting purposes, these are small half-circle or triangle features
  • Wall dormers: are an extension of the vertical wall of the home instead of being set back on the roof

Of these, the shed dormer has been the most popular for our attic remodels—as seen on this home. We were thrilled to help these homeowners add functionality, style and value to their home with an attic master suite conversion using a dormer.

Photos: Cindy Apple Photography

Before & After

One of the most popular Seattle remodels for our company is the attic master suite. When home prices are soaring, homeowners are looking for tangible ways to add more space to their existing home so they don’t have to move. Besides a basement remodel, the best way to add functionality to your home is by adding to and/or finishing an attic space. A dormer addition can add a generous amount of ceiling height, allowing for a bathroom addition in accordance with Seattle building codes (currently a minimum 6’8” height at the center line of bathroom fixtures, and at least 7′ height for 50% of the area in rooms with sloped ceilings). This attic remodel added plenty of headroom by building out a large, extended dormer. The extra space was used to for a linen closet and master bathroom addition, as well as a taller ceiling in the master bedroom. The fresh eucalyptus green and deep greys give the upper floor a modern, but soothing look.

The master bath was the main focus of the remodel; the attic conversion created a private master suite upstairs. The homeowner’s wanted the bathroom to be a retreat, with a large Mirabelle Galatia soaking tub that could also be used as a shower. Other requests included: natural light, a vanity with storage and eye-catching tile. We delivered, and our designer didn’t stop there. The fine details are what make this bathroom addition a Pinterest-worthy space. Shiplap bathtub siding, crystal drawer pulls, Schoolhouse sconces, and a frosted glass door add subtle touches of elegance.

Other work included: new windows, flooring, stairway, railing, insulation, siding and roofing. The Somerset solid oak hardwood flooring is a vast improvement from the preexisting vinyl tile and carpet squares that once blanketed the attic floor. The extension of the hardwood into the bedroom elongates the entire space. The stairwell received a face lift as well with white painted railings and a fun, bubble pendant light.

From the exterior, the dormer addition matches the home in both style and color just as the original dormer did. Scalloped siding brings softness to the brick below, without drawing too much attention. It is a smart choice we agreed with mimicking.

Attic dormers add useful space and natural light to make an attic feel like a natural extension of the home. Common types of dormer additions include:

  • Gable dormers: resemble canine condos, include a roof that peaks in the middle and is pitched on both sides
  • Shed dormers: rectangular and sloped in the same direction as the main roofline
  • Flat roof dormers: a flat extension from the peak of the main roof
  • Hipped dormers: like a gabled dormer but with three sloped roof planes, typical of the American Foursquare home style
  • Eyebrow dormers: more for aesthetic and natural lighting purposes, these are small half-circle or triangle features
  • Wall dormers: are an extension of the vertical wall of the home instead of being set back on the roof

Of these, the shed dormer has been the most popular for our attic remodels—as seen on this home. We were thrilled to help these homeowners add functionality, style and value to their home with an attic master suite conversion using a dormer.

Photos: Cindy Apple Photography